the twitterverse has spoken

A few items from my Twitter feeds stood out over the past day or two.

It turns out spending time with our families makes us way happier than connecting online. The Happiness Barometer says so. Can I get a “well duh?” Catching up after work or eating with family members totaled 60% to a mere 7% between social media and text messaging. While it’s very cool to “meet” new friends and make connections online, I have definitely discovered that talking to family members and friends in real life far surpasses anything that happens only through a screen. That is one of the biggest benefits I’ve experienced from practicing digital Sabbath. Still, there are quite a few folks out there that I would love to meet face to face someday, all of whom I only know digitally at this point.

Funneling kids into life-stage ghettos is a terrible way to engender connections between generations.

Two articles about adolescence and its relationship to the culture of the church caught my attention as well. One at the Catalyst website pointed out the disconcerting link between 13 year old kids having sex and 69% of young adults leaving church by the time they exit their college years. Funneling kids into life-stage ghettos is a terrible way to engender connections between generations. If a 13-year-old can have sex (or engage in “sexting” on a phone mom or dad bought), they can be a real part of the church family. It’s a must-read article.

Adolescence now may be described as lasting from the onset of puberty into one’s early 30s.

My last morsel of brain food is a blog post by Jason Young pointing out that adolescence now may be described as lasting from the onset of puberty (around age 12 and probably inching earlier with every passing decade) into one’s early 30s. Yikes! If that’s anywhere near true, and many indicators support the veracity of this claim, I’m barely out of that stage myself. Yet I’ve been working with “adolescents” for the equivalent of an  emerging adult’s entire life – over 18 years! Huge ramifications for youth ministry and the need for cross-generational mentoring for both leaders and students.

What have you found that’s got you thinking?

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About andrew burden

andrew blogs about being a volunteer youth leader, teacher, video editor, husband, friend, child of God
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